Parc des Eaux-Vives

Bought by the City in 1912, the Parc des Eaux-Vives is one of the oldest parks in Geneva and naturally extends to the Parc La Grange with a separate entrance located on the Quai Gustave-Ador. Its descending slope creates a magnificent view that opens onto the lake and the Jura massif. There is also a charming hotel and an excellent restaurant high up in the park. Built in 1715, this former private mansion is home to the tidiest public park in Geneva, with a breathtaking view of the lake. While strolling through the park, do not miss the pond fed by water from a cave and the enormous multicolored rhododendron massif – a gift from the Netherlands to Geneva in recognition of its humanitarian aid during the Second World War. This is also the site of Geneva’s oldest tennis club, which dates back to 1896.

Parc de La Grange

On the left bank, facing the lake, Parc La Grange offers visitors the most beautiful rose garden in Geneva. The Ella Fitzgerald stage, installed on one of the lawns, offers free concerts during the summer and the Théâtre de l’Orangerie, a varied theatrical program during the summer period.

Parc La Grange is the largest green space in Geneva and some would agree that it is also the most beautiful. The history of the park goes back to the years 50-60 BC, when a wealthy Roman settled on this site – ruins and remains are still visible today, behind the 18th century villa. Its last owner, politician and patron William Favre, bequeathed the park to the city in 1917. This magnificent garden, laid out in 1945, occupies 12,000 m² of land and has more than 200 varieties of plants. In perfect harmony with the architecture, neat flowerbeds, a stone staircase and ponds complete the natural landscape.

Quai Gustave-Ador & Plage des Eaux-Vives

Located on the left bank, the Quai Gustave-Ador is a popular place to walk and relax. The biggest attraction of the Quai is the Jet d’Eau that rises 140 m from the end of the Eaux-Vives pier. The Quai Gustave-Ador was built in 1856 to extend the southern promenade of Lake Geneva from the Jardin Anglais. It stretches for about 1800 m. In 1936-1937, the first rose bushes were planted and since then there have been more than 13,000 of them.

After having been made partially accessible to the population in the summer of 2019, the Plage Publique des Eaux-Vives should open definitively at the end of spring. Convivial and free of charge, this real oasis in the heart of the city has a 400 meters long beach and a two-hectare park. It is the ideal place for bathers and walkers. Thanks to its length – twice that of the promenade on the opposite shore of the lake – it will certainly become one of the favorite resting places for Genevans and many tourists.

Map

Yellow dots: Entrances to the park
Pink dots: TPG  (public transport) stops